Happiness is a state of joy, we can consider happiness as a physical, mental, emotional, or even spiritual state of elation caused by higher and lower order factors.

The freedom to pursue happiness is perhaps the most basic human right, while happiness itself (as a broad concept) can be said to be the meaning of life.

We can understand happiness physiologically, psychologically, or philosophically and look for the many complex drivers and cause and affect relationships. On one level happiness is a testable chemical reaction, but on another level some of the truest words on happiness are spoken by poets. The core is simple, the mechanics complex.

Is happiness gained through aesthetic pleasures (sensual), either immediate or tactically planned, or are more ethical pleasures they key? Which one is more just, virtuous, and ethical? Either/ør is perhaps the best answer, although some (like me) claim A and B, but only in moderation with the two tempering each other.

  1. “If you want happiness for an hour — take a nap.
  2. If you want happiness for a day — go fishing.
  3. If you want happiness for a year — inherit a fortune.
  4. If you want happiness for a lifetime — help someone else.”

– A Chinese Proverb


Factoids tagged with "Happiness"

The Greeks Founded the Basis of Utilitarianism and Consequentialism Fact

Although we can consider Jeremy Bentham the founder of modern Utilitarianism, and his successor John Stuart Mill the one who popularized it, early Greek philosophers like Aristotle, Aristippus and Epicurus presented the original Utilitarian / Consequentialist / Greatest Happiness theories.

Money Can Buy Happiness Fact

Money can buy happiness in some ways, and cause unhappiness in others, studies have shown that different types of wealth and income affect happiness and unhappiness in a variety of ways.

Light Can Affect Mood Fact

Exposure to light in moderation, especially natural sunlight, can have an uplifting effect on mood, while excessive darkness can have the opposite effect.

Thoughts Can Create Reality Myth

Our thoughts can shape our inner reality and outward perceptions of things (neuroplasticity), but to affect or create a reality outside ourselves, we must interact with the world and communicate our thoughts.

Thoughts Can “Rewire” Your Brain Fact

Thoughts and other stimuli can “rewire” our brain by strengthening useful synaptic pathways and weakening less used ones, this is called neuroplasticity (AKA learning and memory).

Blog Posts tagged with "Happiness"

What is Fairness? / What is Justice?

Plato’s Republic, utilitarianism, the philosophies of morality, ethics, politics, virtue, and law are all centered around one question “what is justice?” (AKA “what is fairness?”).

Re-Defining Social Capitalism

Social Capitalism can be defined as a socially minded form of capitalism, where the goal is doing social good, rather than just the accumulation of capital.

The Historical Effects of Wealth Inequality

We examine the historical effects of social, political, and economic inequality on society to see how it has led to social unrest and events like revolutions and populist uprisings.

Vices and Virtues Explained

We present a list of vices and virtues and look at vices and virtues as understood by philosophers like Aristotle and Aquinas.

Essentialism vs. Existentialism

Essentialism is the idea that everything has an essence (something that “makes it, it”). Existentialism says there is no essence (no intrinsic meaning that can be confirmed by the senses or reason).

What is “the Invisible Hand”?

“The invisible hand” is a term used by Adam Smith to describe the theory that self-interest leads to social and economic benefits in a free-market.

Wealth and Income Inequality

We explain economic inequality from a historical perspective, and then consider the effects of wealth inequality and income inequality in America today.

The Point of Life is Happiness

We present a discussion on “the meaning of life as happiness” according to the past philosophers from Aristotle and Epicurus to John Stewart Mill and Immanuel Kant.

Arete Explained

Areté roughly means “moral virtue”. It refers to an innate “excellence” or “essence” in all things, and the striving toward that potential or purpose.