American Politics describes the politics of America since before Liberalism, Enlightenment, and Revolution and to today. The articles below explore the most important aspects of American politics as fun facts and myths.


Factoids tagged with "American Politics"

The Civil War was About Slavery Fact

The Civil war was about slavery, but it wasn’t “just about slavery”. Sectionalism, Protectionism, and States’ Rights were also factors.

Hitler Was a Left-wing Socialist Liberal Myth

The idea that “Hitler was a left-wing socialist liberal” is a myth. Hitler was a Fascist. Fascism has some socialist roots, but it is a unique right-wing authoritarian and nationalist ideology separate from socialism or liberalism.

Pinball Used to Be Illegal Fact

Between the 1940s and the 1970s pinball used to illegal in parts of the United States. It was thought of as a gambling “game of chance” and was caught up in the post-prohibition push-back against gambling.

John Lennon’s Deportation Case Inspired DACA Fact

Some speculate that John Lennon’s status as a vocal anti-war rock icon caused Nixon to push for his deportation… which ironically resulted in a legal case that inspired President Obama’s 2012 immigration policy DACA.

The Founding Fathers Supported Slavery Myth

Slavery was legal when America was founded, but few founding fathers fully supported the nefarious institution. In fact, many founders fought to limit and abolish slavery.

The General Election Decides the President Myth

Votes cast for President and Vice President in the general election are advisory votes, the President and Vice President aren’t decided until the electors’ direct votes are cast and counted.

There is a Gender Pay Gap Fact

The gender pay gap is real, and so is the gender earnings gap. Even after all reasonable differences are factored out, an unexplained pay gap between men and women exists across the board.

Voter Fraud is Real Fact

Voter fraud is real and so is voter suppression. However, widespread voter fraud is very unlikely to occur, and convicted voter fraud in the United States is very uncommon.

A Third Party Can’t Win Myth

Third Parties can win elections, but they rarely do. This is because the United States of America has a two-party system in practice.

The United States Has a Two-Party System Myth

Despite two parties dominating politics due to a majority being needed to win elections, the United States doesn’t officially have a two-party system. Parties aren’t even mentioned in the Constitution.

Stability Breeds Instability Fact

Stability isn’t necessarily destabilizing, but as Hyman Minsky’s Financial Instability Hypothesis eludes: longterm stability breeds instability and diminishes resilience in economic markets, mainly due to psychological factors.

Politics Can be a Science Fact

Politics can be treated as a science (political science), but it must always seek data that can be confirmed by our senses (empirical evidence).

Saul Alinsky Was a Satanist Myth

Saul Alinsky wasn’t a satanist, nor did he dedicate Rules for Radicals to Lucifer. Alinsky simply used Lucifer as a literary device to teach community organizing.

Game Theory is the Study of Games Myth

Game theory involves games, but it isn’t the study of games. It is the study of mathematical models of conflict and cooperation regarding decision making.

Blog Posts tagged with "American Politics"

What is Social Conservatism?

Social Conservatism is the ideology of social hierarchy and tradition that mixes liberal and conservative views. It comes in political and economic forms.

What is Classical Conservatism?

Classical Conservatism is the ideology of authority, hierarchy, order, and tradition (like classical aristocracy). It comes in political and economic forms.

What is Social Liberalism?

Social liberalism is the ideology of collective liberties and rights that favors social welfare and justice. It comes in a political and economic form.

What is Classical Liberalism?

Classical liberalism is the ideology of liberties, rights, individualism, reason, and tolerance that comes in a political and economic form.

Modern, Historic, and General Social Class Systems

All nations have some sort of class system or class structure, generally based on wealth, birth, or status. We explain modern and historic social class systems and the general logic behind them to see to what extent they are natural and what extent they are convention.

The Importance of Individualism

We discuss the importance of individualism and the complexities involved in balancing the spirit of Individualism with collective responsibility.

The Purpose of the Social Safety Net

The Social Safety net is a collection of welfare services meant to help people bounce up when they hit bottom, it is not meant as a net to trap the poor under.

National Populism and Deconstruction

Steve Bannon eluded to a “National Populist” “Deconstruction” agenda in a recent speech. We take a look at the historic meaning of those terms.

What is Conservatism?

Conservatism is the ideology of governmental, cultural, and economic order, tradition, hierarchy, and authority that generally comes in classical, social, and economic forms.

What is a Republic?

We discuss Republics in general including the philosophy of republics, classical and modern republicanism, and real Republics in-action.

What is an Alternative Fact?

Alternative facts describe inconsistent sets of information submitted as plausible evidence for competing sides of a case/debate/argument.

The Origin of the Tea Party Movement

The modern Tea Party is a progressively conservative nativist protectionist populist movement that represent a response to globalism and progressive social liberalism.

Types of American Progressivism

We explain the different types of American progressivism from the founders, to the Reform movements, to Bryan and the Roosevelts, to the progressives and populists of today.

What is Liberalism?

Liberalism is the political ideology of liberty and equality, where classical liberalism emphasizes individual liberty and social liberalism emphasizes social equality.

Advice for Faithless Electors

The article below is written as advice to potential “faithless electors” thinking about how to vote in 2016, but doubles as a lesson in civics regarding the powers and responsibilities of the U.S. Electoral College.

Lessons to Learn from the 2016 Election

If the 2016 election proved anything, it proved that the votes of progressive populists (like Bernie) and nativist populists (like Trump) matter in elections.

Civil Religion

“Civil Religion” is “the religion” of the state. It doesn’t describe the theology of the state, but rather the shared identity built around national symbolism and customs.

Separation of Powers and Checks and Balances

Separation of Powers describes the way in which government is divided into different branches (ex. in the U.S., the legislative, executive, and judicial). Checks and balances describe the powers each branch has to “check” the other branches and ensure a balance of power.

Political Duopolies

We explain political duopolies by looking at the political duopoly in the United States of America and other historic duopolies.

The Historical Effects of Wealth Inequality

We examine the historical effects of social, political, and economic inequality on society to see how it has led to social unrest and events like revolutions and populist uprisings.

What is the General Will?

Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s concept of the General Will roughly means “that which is in the best interest of the people” or “the public good”, and not just popular consensus.

The Origin of Politically Correct

The exact origin of the term politically correct isn’t known, but its first modern usage is from 1793 and the related political argument over tolerance is as old as politics itself.

Types of Governments

We explain the basic classical forms of government and the many types of governments that can be derived from the classical forms.

Plato Vs. Aristotle (Politics)

Plato can be understood as the father of rationalism and political philosophy (political idealism), and Aristotle, his student, the father of empiricism and political science (political realism).

Understanding Cronyism and Monopolies

We explain two types of special interests: cronyism (politicians working with corporate interests) and monopolies (the consolidating of corporate power in a given industry to a single entity).

Federalists and Anti-Federalists Explained

The Federalists and Anti-Federalists were America’s first political factions. They arose out of a debate over the ratification of the 1787 Constitution and went on to form the basis of our current two-party system.

The Origin of the Political Terms Left and Right

The modern usage of the political terms left and right comes from the French Revolution of 1789 when supporters of the king stood to the president’s right, and supporters of the revolution to his left.

Do Fines and Fees Ensure Social Justice, or Do They Harm it?

The Constitution protects our Liberty, but the law has placed limits on this. Those limits are sometimes enforced with large legal fees. To what effect this promotes social justice, and to what effect this harms social justice by creating opposition is debated.

Book Reviews tagged with "American Politics"