Fact

The Pledge of Allegiance was written by a socialist.

The Nationalist Pledge… was Written By a Socialist, and Was Meant to Be Paired With the “Bellamy Salute”

The U.S. Pledge of Allegiance is an oath of allegiance written by Christian socialist minister Francis Bellamy in August 1892. It was meant to paired with a salute. The salute, called the “Bellamy salute,” notably looks a lot like “the Roman salute”. These facts together make the whole history of the Pledge a little odd.[1][2]

NOTE: This story isn’t a statement on politics. It is just a quick recap of the odd history of the Pledge. Nothing less, nothing more. Liberty, equality, [fraternity,] and justice for all. Amen.

The Evolution of the Pledge of Allegiance

Bellamy based his pledge on that of admiral of the Mexican American War George Thatcher Balch, his version read:[3]

“I give my heart and my hand to my country—one country, one language, one flag.”

Bellamy’s original version read:

“I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

FACT: The Pledge was meant for citizens of all countries when it was written. Originally the passage was going to denote liberty, equality, and fraternity (the Jacobin revolutionary saying of the French Revolution often embraced by socialists).

In 1923, after being adopted by the U.S., it was changed to:

“I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

FACT: The Pledge was used since its creation, adopted unofficially in the 20s, and formally adopted by Congress in 1942. Congress gave it the name the Pledge of Allegiance in 1945. One has to assume the concept was to make official a pledge allegiance to the U.S. to build nationalist sentiment during war time.

Then, in response to the growing fear of Communism (which often is atheist) in the 1950s, it was changed to:

“I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

“Fun” Facts About the Pledge of Allegiance

Consider the following facts about the Pledge:

  • Although the word God wan’t originally in Pledge, it was written by a Christian.
  • Although the Pledge is a nationalist thing, it was written by a socialist.
  • Part of the original idea of the Pledge was essentially to give the Roman salute to the flag (it was called the Bellamy Salute). That would be essentially the same salute the fascists used in WWII.

Put it all together and it is an odd story that is likely not exactly what anyone would think.



Conclusion

The Pledge of Allegiance was written by a socialist… and one was supposed to give a version of the Roman salute called the Bellamy salute to the flag.

It is rather strange back story given the events of the 20th century. That is, the nationalist Pledge, was written by a socialist, and involved giving a Roman salute. That is all a little national socialist-y.


Citations

  1. The Pledge of Allegiance
  2. Francis Bellamy
  3. George Thatcher Balch


"The Pledge of Allegiance was Written By a Socialist" is tagged with: American Politics, United States of America


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Eric R. on

LOL. This article was obviously written by a typical ignorant Anti-american leftist trying to portray the pledge and traditional American ideals as something bad. Sad.

Eric R. on

…also no doubt the person who wrote this article voted for the criminal Hillary and is still bitter over fact that we now have a true patriotic and God-fearing President in Donald J. Trump.

Thomas DeMichele
Thomas DeMichele on

Recanting the odd history of the pledge is not a statement against the pledge.

If anything, if I identified as “a leftist – period” I would probably be proud that a socialist wrote the pledge.

Liberty, equality, and fraternity amen.

Thomas DeMichele
Thomas DeMichele on

See my other comment.

I don’t see how offering a quick recap of our odd history makes me ignorant.

Also, nowhere here do I say anything negative about our American ideals. In fact, if you read the site, it doubles as a giant patriotic essay on the perks of liberalism and republicanism and Americanism. Sure, I’m not an America first guy, but I mean, I am a liberal republican, so how could you expect me to appreciate a know-nothing campaign of bigotry.

Now those recent Bush and McCain speeches though, that is something I can stand for. Just like, I’ll stick with the hand over my heart and not the salute.

Jeff on

There is absolutely nothing political in this article. You should just delete this idiot’s comments. They contain no sound or objective feedback, and only serve to proselytize his clearly delusional political beliefs.

Thomas DeMichele
Thomas DeMichele on

We generally post all comments that are on topic and not overly offensive. It might not always be a benefit to the article, but it keeps things honest.